Archive for the ‘Craig Stammen’ Category

Rollins Rolls The Nats, 6-2

Saturday, July 12th, 2014

Untitled

The Philadelphia Phillies are hot. Coming off a sweep of the Milwaukee Brewers, the Phillies pitched and homered their way to a 6-2 victory over the Washington Nationals in Philadelphia on Friday night, with righty A.J. Burnett and veteran shortstop Jimmy Rollins leading the way.

The Philadelphia win came against D.C. ace and All Star Jordan Zimmermann, who had difficulty with his command early in the game and was forced to leave it due to a biceps cramp in the 4th inning. While Zimmermann’s bicep injury probably isn’t serious, it will keep him out of the All Star game.

“It was getting a little tight in the last inning, and every pitch, it was getting tighter and tighter,” Zimmermann said of his decision to leave the game. “It was cramping up. I didn’t want to push it too far and have something worse happen. I figured it would be best if I came out.

Prior to his departure from the game, Zimmermann gave up an unusual four runs on six hits, which included a third inning two run home run off the bat of Rollins. Rollins stroked another round tripper in the bottom of the 7th inning against Washington reliever Craig Stammen.

While Philadelphia was scoring runs on Zimmermann and battling hard against the usually steady Stammen (who gave up two runs on four hits in just 3.1 innings of work), A.J. Burnett was working his veteran magic on the mound. Burnett threw 7.2 innings, holding the Nationals to just five hits while striking out six.

“Burnett has been tough on us. He beat us twice here, but we got him at home,” Nats’ skipper Matt Williams said of the Philadelphia veteran. “The ball moves. He is pretty good. He has an idea of what he wants to do and how he wants to attack hitters. He had [all his pitches] working tonight . . . ”

The only good piece of news for the Nationals (outside of the report that Zimmermann’s injury is not thought to be serious) is that Bryce Harper connected for a round tripper — his second on the year — after a long drought. Harper’s homer came in the 7th with no one on. Ryan Zimmerman added to the Nats total in the 8th with a double that scored Jayson Werth.

Screen Shot 2014-07-12 at 8.57.33 AM

Those Are The Details, Now For The Headlines: They’re starting to pack them in at Safeco Field in Seattle, and for good reason. The Mariners are seven games over .500 on the year and climbing steadily upwards towards the dominating Oakland A’s in the American League West . . .

Perhaps the most important game the Griffeys have played this year took place on Friday night, with Seattle’s Felix Hernandez facing off against Oakland newbie Jeff Samardzija. Hernandez came into the game sporting a snappy 2.11 ERA, while Samardzija was making his second appearance for the White Elephants after his trade from Chicago . . .

The result was a dramatic pitchers’ duel that saw Samardzija pitch a complete game — and lose. The former Notre Dame righty threw brilliantly, giving up only five hits and three runs, but Hernandez was just that much better. King Felix dominated the Oakland line-up, striking out nine A’s, making way for closer Fernando Rodney in the 9th . . .

(more…)

Baltimore Barrage Bombs The Nats In 11

Tuesday, July 8th, 2014

Untitled

An old-fashioned pitchers’ duel that lasted through seven-plus innings pitting Chris Tillman against Stephen Strasburg gave way to an extra inning Baltimore barrage at Nationals Park on Monday night, with the Orioles coming away with an 11 inning 8-2 win in the first of a four game set of the Battle of the Beltways Series.

The Baltimore victory was triggered in the top of the 11th inning in a 2-2 tie game, when the Orioles sent nine batters to the plate against long reliever Craig Stammen. Over the next half inning (though not in this order), the Orioles scored six runs on two singles (from Nelson Cruz and Nick Hundley), a Nick Markakis double and home runs off the bats of Chris Davis, J.J. Hardy and Manny Machado.

The big score in the 11th came off the bat of the otherwise slumping Chris Davis, who entered the game hitting under .200. “Stammen made some tough pitches, some close pitches,” Davis said after his 11th inning heroics. “I was just able to hang in there.” The Davis home run came on a 3-2 count when Stammen threw the power hitter a fastball that was high in the zone.

Screen Shot 2014-07-08 at 3.26.31 AM

“I really did not think he would be able to hit that pitch out,” Stammen said of the pitch to Davis. “He was right on it and he was looking for it. It was a little bit higher than I wanted.” The Davis round tripper seemed to tip the scales against the Nationals, as the Orioles showed why they’re one of the best hitting teams in the game.

In fact, however, the final score didn’t reflect what a tough, well-played and exciting pitchers’ duel the game was until it went into extra innings. Stephen Strasburg was nearly flawless in his start, throwing seven innings of four hit baseball while striking out nine. Baltimore starter Chris Tillman was nearly as good, matching Strasburg’s seven innings while striking out six.

The O’s and Nats both got on the scoreboard in the same way. Baltimore initial two runs came on a Nelson Cruz home run in the top of the 4th that scored Manny Machado, while the Nats first two runs came off the bat of Anthony Rendon who launched his 12th in the bottom of the 6th. Rendon’s round tripper scored Denard Span.

Manny Machado had a big night for the Orioles, going 5-6 with two RBIs. Nelson Cruz accounted for two more Baltimore runs in a 3-5 night. The big bat for Washington was Anthony Rendon, who was 2-5 and raised his season BA to .284.

Screen Shot 2014-07-08 at 2.10.24 AM

Those Are The Details, Now For The Headlines: Washington fans have plenty of reason to gripe about the final All Star selections, and gripe they have. A good case can be made that Rafael Soriano should have made the team as a closer ahead of Milwaukee head-case Francisco Rodriguez . . .

Soriano has better numbers than “K-Rod” and stacks up well against Aroldis Chapman, who made the team (in our opinion) more on the basis of his velocity than his 9th inning wizardry. If it were up to us (and of course, it isn’t), we would have removed K-Rod and Chapman and picked Soriano and savvy San Diego stalwart Huston Street . . .

Washington will be under-represented in Minneapolis, with one player on the roster. But the selection of Jordan Zimmerman was both right and obvious — he’s been Washington’s most consistent and feared starter, even given Stephen Strasburg’s latest snazzy numbers . . .

The Washington Post’s Adam Kilgore made a strong case for Anthony Rendon being on the team over Matt Carpenter. Our view is that St. Louis skipper Mike Matheny can be justly accused of being a partisan, which we might come to expect from anyone in a Redbirds uniform. Cardinals fans have always struck us as believing that Busch Stadium is the world’s navel with the clydesdales the equivalent of the Bald Eagle . . .

(more…)

Strasburg, Werth Crush The Rox

Wednesday, July 2nd, 2014

Untitled

Nats ace Stephen Strasburg recouped from his last outing, when he gave up seven earned runs against the Brewers, by thrashing the Colorado Rockies in 7.2 dominant innings. Coupled with Jayson Werth’s stellar 2-3, three RBI night at the plate, the Nats forged a 7-1 laugher at Nationals Park.

Strasburg’s outing was among his best of the year. The righty threw into the eighth inning, giving up five hits while striking out eight and was only relieved after giving up a home run (to D.J. LeMahieu) and a walk (to Cory Dickerson) in the 8th inning. Long reliever Craig Stammen finished the game on the mound for the Nationals.

“I was able to command the fastball a little bit better,” Strasburg said after his strong performance. “They were fouling them off. I wouldn’t say they were great pitches. I was able to execute the pitch a little bit better. I had them put it in play and make weak contact.”

Rockies’ starter Christian Friedrich, meanwhile, was victimized by a line-up that hit him hard. But Colorado pitching, suspect all season, gave seven free passes on the night, which included Friedrich’s two walks to start the game. Washington scored three runs in the 1st and four runs in the fourth.

Screen Shot 2014-07-02 at 8.41.40 AM

Friedrich’s first two walks came back to haunt him. The Colorado youngster walked Denard Span and Anthony Rendon to start the game and they were driven home by a Jayson Werth double down the left field line that followed an Adam LaRoche single. A sacrifice fly off the bat of Ryan Zimmerman accounted for the first inning’s third run.

The Nationals continued the onslaught in the fourth inning, starting with a Stephen Strasburg double after Wilson Ramos struck out. Chad Bettis came on in relief of Friedrich, after the embattled starter walked Denard Span. But Bettis couldn’t close the door: An Anthony Rendon double scored Strasburg and Span, while another Jayson Werth double scored Rendon.

The Nationals have now won four in a row and are seven games over .500, their best mark of the year. “For the better part of the last few weeks, just the way we are going about it, the pitching has been great, the defense has been good,”┬áJayson Werth acknowledged after the team win. “The offense is coming around. I like the way we are setting up here going into July.”

Untitled

The Wisdom of Section 1-2-9: There were complaints about the game from season ticket holders on Tuesday night, but they had nothing to do with the Nationals. “The only reason I got Rockies tickets was to see Troy Tulowitzki play,” one of the section’s regular complained, “and wouldn’t you know it — they decided to rest him . . .”

The comment sparked a lively argument on Tulowitzki’s career, which has been marred by injuries. “He’s the best hitter in the National League,” one fan claimed, a statement that garnered broad agreement, along with one dissent. “[Giancarlo] Stanton is better, more power,” this fan said . . .

This year’s statistics show the two in a dead heat: Tulowitzki leads the league in batting average, but Stanton has three more home runs (21 for Stanton, 18 for Tulowitzki). But Tulowitzki leads everyone in OBP, Slugging and OPS. The numbers show that Tulo is having a monster year . . .

Nor surprisingly, the other main topic of discussion focused on remarks made by Bryce Harper about who should be starting for the Nationals — and where. The comments generated a lot of criticism from baseball analysts, who reflected that Harper would be better off playing the game, while leaving the job of filling out the line-up card to Matt Williams . . .

(more…)

Cubs 7th Inning Rally Downs The Nats

Friday, June 27th, 2014

Untitled

These are the last place Cubs, the Chicago Doormats who can’t pitch, can’t hit and can’t run. But you’d never know it from the way they played on Thursday night on the North Side of Chicago, where they rallied for two runs in the 7th inning to down the Washington Nationals, 5-3.

The Chicago 7th came after the Nationals fought back on a 3-0 deficit to tie the game — punching a single run across the plate in the 6th, then putting two more on the scoreboard in the 7th. Chicago’s runs came off of Washington long reliever Craig Stammen, who gave up a double to light hitting Darwin Barney, a Chris Coghlan walk and a two RBI double to Justin Ruggiano. The Ruggiano double was just inside the third base line and past Anthony Rendon.

“Stammen’s been really good for us, and it started with Barney and him trying to go down and away with a slider and hung it over the middle of the plate,” Nats skipper Matt Williams said following the loss. “He was one pitch from getting out of it. It’s tough to see from the dugout, but I don’t how that ball [the Ruggiano double] was fair, but not by a lot.”

Nats starter Doug Fister, who’d had multiple quality starts over the last month, struggled to keep the Cubs off the board. But a three run fourth inning gave the Cubs the early lead, with the middle of the Cubs line-up of first sacker Anthony Rizzo, shortstop Starlin Castro and catcher Welington Castillo providing Chicago’s firepower.

“Felt like I was executing, but at the same time, the pitches need to be a little bit better,” Washington righty and starter Fister said. “I need to make sure they’re in or out a little bit more, down more. If I get it in a little bit further on that jam shot over the infield, then who knows. A lot of ‘shoulda-woulda-couldas,’ it’s just a matter of going out there and getting it done.”

The game was played under less than ideal conditions. A fog rolled in off of Lake Michigan in the afternoon and caused havoc among outfielders, including Nats centerfield Denard Span, who lost a fly ball in the gray soup. “Just rough conditions,” Span said after the loss. “Nothing you can do to prepare for that. I don’t think I’ve ever played in a game with that much fog.”

Screen Shot 2014-06-27 at 11.07.28 AM

Those Are The Details, Now For The Headlines: The Cubbies may be a last place team, but they’ve been a tough team over the last forty games. They are 20-17 in that period (and 13-11 in June) as their younger players have begun to hit, and their bullpen is ranked seventh in the majors and fourth in the National League . . .

Baseball analysts will tell you that the Cubs rebuilding process is taking a little longer than either President of Baseball Operations Theo Epstein and G.M. Jed Hoyer thought it would take, but there’s no doubt the Cubs farm system is packed. It’s only a matter of time before Cubs fans see the results with the Big Club . . .

(more…)

Nats Win In 16 On Zimmerman Home Run

Wednesday, June 25th, 2014

Untitled

Ryan Zimmerman’s two run home run in the top of the 16th inning was the difference in Washington’s 4-2 victory over the Brewers on Tuesday night (actually, Wednesday morning) — what went into the books as the longest game in Nationals history. By then, the Nationals had burned through their bullpen, and were set to send Adam LaRoche to the mound in the 17th.

While Zimmerman notched the game winning RBI, the Nationals bullpen was once again stellar. Jerry Blevins, Aaron Barrett, Craig Stammen, Ross Detwiler, Drew Storen and Tyler Clippard pitched the near-equivalent of a complete game, ending Milwaukee threats in the bottom of the 13th, 14th and 15th innings.

The Washington Post notes that the game used up “fifteen pitchers and 24 position players” and that “485 pitches were thrown and the teams combined for 111 at-bats.” By the time the game was over, Washington starter Jordan Zimmermann’s solid start (six innings, six hits, nine strike outs) was a fading memory.

Screen Shot 2014-06-25 at 10.16.45 AM

Zimmermann had no-hitter stuff to begin the game, but the Brewers pressed him hard in the fourth and fifth innings. “The fourth and fifth were a little rough,” Zimmermann acknowledged on his outing. “First time through the lineup, I used the fastball and it was good. Second time through, they made some adjustments. I was leaving some balls up. They strung a few hits together.”

While it was Zimmerman who keyed the victory, much of the credit for the win must go to lefty Ross Detwiler, who threw four innings of four hit baseball in relief. It was, by far, Detwiler’s best outing of the year. “Det was above and beyond tonight,” manager Matt Williams said. “Going in, we had some guys that were feeling [tired], so we didn’t want to go to them. Turned out, we had to. Det was fantastic. He really stretched it for us.”

This was a big win for the Nationals, a victory over a tough team with a solid and power-packed line-up. The win kept Washington two games in front of Atlanta in the National League East and, after the Nationals throat gulping performance against the Cardinals, showed that the team can play tough against tough teams.

For the Brewers, on the other hand, the twin losses against the Nationals throw a shadow on a season that, at least so far, has been a dream. But despite the two losses, Milwaukee leads the National League in wins and they remain 4.5 games ahead of the Cardinals in the N.L. Central.

The Brewers loss squandered an excellent outing from Yovani Gallardo, who threw six innings while giving up just four hits. Like Washington, Milwaukee had to depend on its bullpen, with Mike Fiers pitching the last four innings of the marathon game and taking the loss.

Those Are The Details, Now For The Headlines: Theo Epstein’s Chicago Cubs, the doormat of the N.L. Central, have set a pattern — the front office accumulates veteran hurlers, then swaps them out for younger pieces. This has occurred in each of the last three years, with Epstein shipping aging arms Paul Maholm, Matt Garza and Scott Feldman hither and yon for younger arms and a handful of prospects and potentials . . .

Now, those swaps are starting to work out, and the future Cubbies are finally beginning to take shape. Fans of the North Siders could see that future on the mound at Wrigley last night, when former Orioles prospect Jake Arrieta continued his remarkable climb to prominence as a solid Cubs starter . . .

(more…)

Roark (And The Nats Bullpen) Stump The Braves

Sunday, June 22nd, 2014

Untitled

Nationals skipper Matt Williams remained his usual unsmiling self after the Nationals bested the Braves on Sunday afternoon at Nationals Park, but allowed himself a fleeting moment of semi-humor. “I am going to respectfully not answer that question, if that’s okay,” he said when asked if the Nationals now had momentum in the N.L. East. “I know how this works.”

It’s not superstition exactly, but it’s pretty close: As Williams himself noted, “there’s a long way to go” and “we need to take one game at a time.” But Washington’s 4-1 win and a split in the Atlanta series in front of 39,000-plus Nats fans must have come as a relief to Williams, as it did to the Nationals players.

“Oh yeah, they’ve had our number,” Nats center fielder Denard Span, who got a key hit in the win, said after the victory. “So it’s good to come away with a win today.” The Nationals Sunday win came on yet another strong pitching performance from starter Tanner Roark — and a shutdown bullpen that yielded nadda, zippo, zero (3.2 innings, no hits and three strikeouts) to a tough hitting Braves line-up.

Screen Shot 2014-06-22 at 5.33.46 PM

Roark, who lasted 5.1 innings, did not have his best stuff, but set the tone by holding the Braves to four hits. Roark was frustrating for Braves hitters, who argued several high strike zone calls from home plate umpire Mark Carlson. The Braves Chris Johnson was ejected in the top of the 6th (here’s the video, and we trust you can read lips) and Justin Upton was tossed just prior to the end of the game.

The Nationals put two runs on the board in the bottom of the 1st (on an Adam LaRoche single and a Ryan Zimmerman sacrifice fly), added single runs in the 5th (on a clutch Denard Span double that scored Sandy Leon), and added an insurance run in the 8th when Anthony Rendon scored on a wild pitch.

The Nationals broke out for nine hits in their win on Sunday, but the key to the series split was the team’s pitching — and particularly their relief corps. Storen, Clippard and Soriano all pitched well in the series, but Craig Stammen was the standout, throwing 4.2 innings in relief while giving up a single hit. If we had to pick a hurler to go to Minneapolis for the All Star game, it would be Stammen.

Those Are The Details, Now For The Headlines: Speaking of superstition — as soon as we wrote that Cincinnati should shovel their bats into a wood chipper they scored eleven runs on Saturday and another four today. This followed the 14-8 stunner on Friday night, in which they led Toronto 8-0 after two, but ended up losing the game . . .

We know how it looks, but we’re going to stick with what we said. Of all the teams in the National League, the Cincinnati Bridesmaids are the most disappointing. They hit more home runs than the Nationals (not a surprise, come to think of it), but can’t seem to put runs on the board when they need to, and seem to fall asleep in big games. It’s a puzzle . . .

The only reason we mention this is that our cheeky coverage of the Redlegs sparked an avalanche of reader emails (well, an avalanche for us), decrying our anti-Cincinnati bias and our “premature prediction” (all predictions are, by nature, premature — but nevermind) in counting them out of the running in the N.L. Central . . .

(more…)

Nats Hold Off Astros, Back In The Win Column

Wednesday, June 18th, 2014

Untitled

Dallas Keuchel is probably the best pitcher you’ve never heard of. Entering Tuesday’s game at Nationals Park, the Houston southpaw (at 8-3 and with a snappy 2.38 ERA) was known for two things: getting great hitters to hit groundballs and getting good hitters to miss them.

But on Tuesday, the Nationals got to Houston’s young lefty, mixing line-drives with a raft of doubles to give the All Star-bound Keuchel his fourth loss of the season. In all, the resurgent Nationals (coming off a four game slump and a sweep in St. Louis) banged out six runs and nine hits on Houston pitching, downing the ‘Stros 6-5.

While the victory propelled Washington back into first place in the N.L. East (but just by a scootch), the win wasn’t as decisive as it might have been. Starter Tanner Roark could not locate his fastball (“my bailout was my curveball tonight,” he confirmed after his outing), while Houston’s impressive array of young hitters rallied against reliever Tyler Clippard, scoring four in the 8th.

Washington starter Tanner Roark lasted just five innings, but took the win, his sixth of the season. “It was a grind. Just one of those nights,” Roark said. “I couldn’t get ahead, but came up with some big pitches. And of course we come out early and score runs so it takes a lot of weight off.”

Washington’s anemic offense, on full display in St. Louis, got hot on Tuesday, with both Ryan Zimmerman and Anthony Rendon accounting for five of Washington’s six runs. Rendon doubled twice to drive in three runs, while Zimmerman added two doubles and two RBIs.

Tuesday night’s negative came from Tyler Clippard who had an unusual (which is to say — unheard of) meltdown in the 8th. Following on solid outings from relievers Craig Stammen and Drew Storen, Clippard gave up five hits and four runs in pitching just two-thirds of an inning.

In truth, however, some of Clippard’s difficulties came from facing a Houston line-up that has the best record in baseball since May 22. The 8th showed why so many in the game are suddenly paying attention to the Astros, with Houston’s line-up stacked with a budding superstar second sacker (Jose Altuve) a long ball rookie in George Springer and a left handed hitting gapper in Jon Singleton.

Screen Shot 2014-06-18 at 8.29.10 AM

Those Are The Details, Now For The Headlines: If the Miami Marlins played all of their games at home they’d walk away with the National League East. On Tuesday night, after losing to the Cubs the night before (and after falling to the Bucs in two of three games), the Marlins rallied for a 6-5 victory behind a three run homer from Garrett Jones . . .

The Marlins are 24-14 at Marlins Park, where it’s still possible to overhear private conversations — and where home runs hit to left field can be picked up by the cleaning crew at the end of a game. Last night, the Marlins played in front of 20,000 fans, not bad (actually) for a team that’s 26th in attendance . . .

(more…)