Archive for the ‘Stephen Strasburg’ Category

Nats Blasts Not Enough Against The Giants

Saturday, October 4th, 2014

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Bryce Harper and Asdrubal Cabrera each homered for the Nationals, but the round trippers weren’t enough to tame the Giants, as Washington fell to San Francisco 3-2 in the first game of their five game National League Division Series face-off. The two teams will continue their fight to play in the N.L. Championship series on Saturday.

The Giants victory was fueled by a nose-in-the-dirt outing from San Francisco righty Jake Peavy, who no-hit the Nationals into the 5th inning, when Bryce Harper finally connected for an infield single. When Peavy exited the game after two outs in the 6th, he’d held the Nationals to just two hits and no runs and had struck out three.

“Peavy was unbelievable,” Harper said, following hit team’s loss. “He has been in this game a long time. I don’t know if I should be saying this, but I love his mentality out there and the way he pitches. He screams and yells and does what he does out there. That’s a gamer’s mentality. I have the utmost respect for Peavy for the way he threw tonight.”

Washington starter Stephen Strasburg, meanwhile, labored through five innings, giving up eight hits. The Giants played a small ball, hit-to-contact game against Strasburg, nickel-and-diming him with line-drive singles up the middle. Singles from Joe Panik, Brandon Belt and Buster Posey put the Giants ahead, 3-0 by the 7th inning.

The Giants’ hit-em-where-they-aint’s routine was frustrating for Washington’s young righty, who put in a solid performance, but took the loss. “Wasn’t like they were hitting me all around the yard,” Strasburg acknowledged, following his loss. “Hit it where we weren’t.”

Washington finally clawed back from the early deficit in the 7th, when Bryce Harper and Asdrubal Cabrera launched home runs that brought the Nationals within a single run. Harper’s breathtaking homer landed in the upper deck of right field, as the 45-000-plus Nats fans screamed their appreciation.

Jerry Blevins, Craig Stammen, Matt Thornton and Tyler Clippard followed Strasburg to the mound, providing workmanlike relief to the righty ace. But San Francisco responded by putting an extra run on the board in the 7th against Stammen, when Joe Panik led off the inning with a triple and was plated by a clutch Buster Posey single.

“Like I said, we had opportunities,” Nats skipper Matt Williams told the press after his team’s loss. “One swing of the bat can mean the difference in our game today. It didn’t happen. We will see if it can happen tomorrow.”

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Those Are The Details, Now For The Headlines: Bryce Harper’s 7th inning home run traveled 445 feet and landed in the third tier, bouncing forward where it was retrieved by a fan. The home run came off reliever Hunter Strickland, a late season addition to the Giants’ roster and the reputed “closer of the future” for San Francisco . . .

The Giants game plan against Strasburg was to hit his fastball up the middle, and not to do too much. It seemed to work. “He was good,” manager Matt Williams said. “Throwing strikes early. It wasn’t that he was so excited that he wasn’t throwing strikes. Worked through the first inning well. I think he pitched fine . . . ”

Nats fans were silenced, and a little surprised, by San Francisco’s early offensive, but then got back into the game when Harper homered. When Asdrubal Cabrera then hit his round tripper (following a Wilson Ramos “K”), lifting his arms into the air to spur the home town crowd, the fans responded . . .

Cabrera’s home run didn’t have the distance of Harper’s, but it was impressive nonetheless. The offering from Hunter Strickland was high-and-away, and came in at 97 mph. Cabrera reached out to get it, and actually pulled it down the right field line. Very few 97 mph fastballs are pulled that well . . .

Strickland is an impressive addition for the Giants who is capable of providing late inning heat. But his final line on Friday was downright terrible. He gave up two hits, both of them home runs, and his final ERA for the day came in at a solid 18.00 . . .

The Nationals stranded seven runners on Friday and were 0-7 with runners in scoring position. That was the difference in the game, though the Giants pointed to the performance of starter Peavy and their playoff experience as the key to their victory . . .

“I think we tapped into our postseason experience,” San Francisco closer Sergio Romo said. “There’s that little extra thing in our chemistry — that focus, that determination — that separates postseason games from regular-season games. Everything seems to matter in the playoffs . . .

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It’s Nats-Giants In NLDS

Thursday, October 2nd, 2014

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Giants southpaw Madison Bumgarner shut out the Pittsburgh Pirates on Wednesday night, 8-0, propelling San Francisco into the National League Division Series, where they will face the Washington Nationals. Bumgarner threw a complete game four hitter in leading the Giants.

The Giants’ win came off the arm of Bumgarner, and the bats of shortstop Brandon Crawford and Brandon Belt. Crawford hit a grand slam home run in the fourth inning to give San Francisco a four run lead, while Belt chipped away at Pirates pitching with two hits and three RBIs.

“We got outplayed tonight,” Pittsburgh second baseman Neil Walker said after his team was eliminated from the post season. “Bumgarner went out there, he did what he wanted to do. He put up the strike zone and he made it tough on us.”

The Giants victimized Pittsburgh starter Edinson Volquez, who was rocked for five runs in just five innings of work. The Pirates followed with five relievers, but Pittsburgh’s hitters still couldn’t get to Bumgarner, who threw 109 pitches in the game, 79 of them for strikes.

The Giants win sets up a five game series with the Nationals in Washington. The Nats are expected to throw ace Stephen Strasburg in the opening game of the series on Friday, while the Giants will throw veteran Jake Peavy and follow with another veteran, Tim Hudson. The Nationals took five of the seven games in which they faced the Giants this year.

While Washington has yet to make its final roster and starting rotation decisions, the team is expected to follow Strasburg with Jordan Zimmermann and Doug Fister. Gio Gonzalez will be the sole Washington lefty starter should Washington need him. The first game of the series will be played at 3 pm on Friday at Nationals Park.

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Those Are The Details, Now For The Headlines: Washington’s Internet Baseball Writers Association announced their 2014 player awards on Wednesday, and CFG was one of the voters. Anthony Rendon took top honors among the voters in winning the Goose Goslin Most Valuable Player Award while Jordan Zimmermann was named the winner of the Walter Johnson starting pitcher award . . .

Centerfield Gate was outside this mainstream: we voted Denard Span the team MVP and Doug Fister the team’s best starting pitcher (this was before we saw Zimmermman’s no-hitter, which might have changed our vote). Drew Storen received the best reliever award, while Adam LaRoche was named the teams best slugger . . .

It’s worth reviewing the season’s final player stats — to show just how solid the Nationals were in the regular season. Washington’s Span led the the N.L. in hits (tied with Philadelphia’s Ben Revere), Anthony Rendon was fifth and Jayson Werth was in the top 30 . . .

Anthony Rendon led the league in runs scored (with 111), while Werth was third in OBP (.394). Rendon and Span were fourth in doubles, Adam LaRoche was fifth in RBIs and Span was fifth in stolen bases. It was a solid year for the team at the plate (fifth in BA, fourth in OBP, fifth in Slugging, fourth in OPS) . . .

But no one outshone the Nationals on the mound, where Washington finished first in team ERA, was second in the league in shutouts (behind the Dodgers) and gave up fewer walks than anyone. Doug Fister and Jordan Zimmermann finished in the top ten in ERA, while Stephen Strasburg finished tied with Johnny Cueto for the league lead in strikeouts . . .

The Nationals had the second best bullpen in the National League (just behind San Diego, and measured by bullpen ERA), and has to be accounted as having one of the best benches. The Nats weighed in with the best record in the National League, at 96-66. But the most important test yet remains, and it begins tomorrow — against the Giants . . .

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Nats Sweep In Miami, Return For Final Homestand

Monday, September 22nd, 2014

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The Nationals completed an impressive four game sweep of the Marlins on Sunday afternoon in Miami 2-1, behind a strong seven inning outing from righty Stephen Strasburg. The Nats righty struck out five while giving up three hits and no runs, keeping Washington ahead of the Los Angeles Dodgers in the race for the best record in the National League.

“Really important, a good road trip for us against some teams that has been playing well especially here in a place where they play very good at home,” Nationals manager Matt Williams said, following the victory. “We won some close ones and pitching was good, that certainly will keep you in any ballgame.

This was Strasburg’s 13th win of the year and, with just seven games left in the season (three against the Mets, four against Miami), the Washington ace seems to be peaking at just the right time. Strasburg threw 84 pitches, 55 of them for strikes. “Just have to keep the train rolling,” Strasburg said following his strong outing.

With Strasburg on his game, the Nats needed just two runs to subdue the Marlins, and got both of them in the top of the 5th inning on a lead-off double from Jose Lobaton, an RBI triple from Nate Schierholtz and an Anthony Rendon double to left. Washington victimized Miami starter Nathan Eovaldi, who gave up seven hits in six innings.

Washington’s bullpen once against provided a solid performance. Craig Stammen provided a no hit, no run 8th inning, while Rafael Soriano (making a rare appearance in a save situation), gave up a single run in preserving the Nationals victory.

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Those Are The Details, Now For The Headlines: With less than a week to go in the regular season, now might be a good time to check this year’s attendance figures — which are down from last year. Baseball has drawn 155,000 fewer fans to this point this year than to a similar point in 2013, a relatively insignificant per game decline. Still . . .

Washington has contributed to this, with a fall-off of 1,065 fans per game. That’s a marginal difference and well in line with the standard in baseball, where attendance figures lag performance by a year. Given the Nationals run to the playoffs in the 2014 campaign, we can expect the team’s attendance to go back up in 2015 . . .

Not to worry. It was going to be difficult for the franchise to outdraw last year’s totals, which were the best since 2005, the Nationals first year in D.C. Then too, the franchise’s attendance figures continue to be solid, putting them just ahead of the middle of the pack in the MLB. They currently rank 12th in attendance per game . . .

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It’s All Strasburg In Atlanta

Tuesday, September 16th, 2014

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The Nationals edged closer to playing in October Monday night, downing the Braves at Atlanta’s Turner Field behind the shut-down seven inning pitching of righty ace Stephen Strasburg. Strasburg stymied the Braves, 4-2, leaving the Nationals on the verge of their second National League East championship in three years.

Strasburg has always had difficulty pitching against the Braves at Turner Field and entered the game with a stiff neck, but none of these problems were much in evidence on Monday. The righty gave up five hits while striking out seven and walking none in a 90 pitch outing. The win gave the Nats their league leading 86th win on the season.

“I’ve never seen him pitch bad against us,” Braves skipper Fredi Gonzalez said after the Nats win. “You see the numbers, the seven-plus ERA his last four starts here. He’s a pretty darn good pitcher every time we face him. I know those numbers don’t bare that. But he’s a guy that we respect. He’s a guy who has been a big pitcher for them.”

Strasburg’s win was also the result of timely Nationals hitting, which began with a Denard Span double off of Atlanta starter Ervin Santana in the third inning. Span’s double plated Wilson Ramos for Washington’s first score. Ramos then homered in the top of the 5th inning for the Nats second score. The Nats added their third run on a Strasburg single in the 7th and a Nate Schierholtz RBI in the 8th.

The Braves mounted a comeback in the 9th inning, with Rafael Soriano taking the mound to protect a 4-0 lead. Andrelton Simmons greeted Soriano with a double and then scored on a Justin Upton double to left. When Soriano walked Chris Johnson with two outs, Nats manager Matt Williams brought in Drew Storen to get the third out — a B.J. Upton grounder that ended the game.

The Braves frustration at falling out of both the race for the N.L. East crown and a spot as a Wild Card team was evidenced in the 6th inning when first sacker Freddie Freeman was called out on strikes by home plate umpire Tim Timmons. Freeman slammed his bat in disgust and was ejected from the game; when Gonzalez defended his player, he was also tossed.

We all collectively, from the front office to our coaches to our fans, we want to win,” said manager Fredi Gonzalez. “Anything short of us getting into some playoff game or play-in game is not acceptable. You see guys fighting.”

The loss symbolized the demise of the Braves who, despite their early season woes with a rash of pitching injuries, were supposed to contend with the Nationals for the N.L East title. That’s not what happened: Atlanta played well against the Nats, but poorly against the rest of the league. Last night’s loss put them at a so-so 75-75 for the year. A disappointment . . .

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Those Are The Details, Now For The Headlines: Baltimore’s Orioles are a single win away from clinching their first American League East title since 1997. Last night, against the Toronto Blue Jays, they continued their dominance of their division, finishing off the struggling Jays, 5-2. If they win again tonight, they’ll win the A.L. East crown . . .

It seemed only right that Wei-Yin Chen would be the pitcher to lead the O’s in Toronto. After last night’s performance (the underrated southpaw scattered nine hits in 5.2 innings of work), Chen is 16-4 on the season, the first time a Baltimore lefty had 16 or more wins in a season since Jimmy Key did it way back when . . .

“I allowed quite a few hits out there, but I was trying to battle,” Chen said of his performance after his team’s victory. “I was trying to keep the ball down without allowing too many runs. Fortunately I can do that with the help of my teammates . . .”

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Nats In “Epic Collapse” As Phillies Win In 11

Saturday, September 6th, 2014

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If there are “epic wins” (and there have been this season), then there are certainly “epic losses” — and, for the Washington Nationals, Friday night was one of them. Leading by three runs going into the 9th inning, Nationals closer Rafael Soriano gave up two home runs (to Carlos Ruiz and Ben Revere) and Washington went on to lose to the Philadelphia Phillies in 11 innings, 9-8.

The loss featured nearly every up (and down) that Nationals fans have seen this year: a solid outing from starter Stephen Strasbug (who threw six solid innings of four hit baseball), a hot hand from a heroic Adam LaRoche (who hit yet another home run and notched three RBIs), and a wobbly 9th from an embattled closer whose job is now in jeopardy.

And there was also the unusual, and surprising — including a muffed fly ball off the bat of Dominic Brown in the 11th inning that featured a keystone cops-like outfield collision between Bryce Harper and Denard Span. Two batters later, a throwing error from Tyler Moore allowed Brown to score. Philadelphia’s two runs in the 11th held up to give the Ashburns the win.

After the loss, left fielder Harper confirmed that he was at fault in the rare outfield play, which gave the Nationals three errors on the night. “It got to the point where I thought I could get it, he called it and we bump into each other,” Harper said. “Center field priority, of course. I got to get out of there.”

So what now? As the boos rained down on Soriano when he walked from the mound to the dugout in the 9th, it was clear that skipper Matt Williams would have to rethink who will close games for the home towners, a viewpoint that a testy Williams confirmed during his tense post-game press conference.

“We’re certainly going to have to take a hard look at it,” Williams told the press after the game. “It’s not an easy decision. None of them are. But we want to be able to close those games out. Sori understands that, he’s been around the block.”

The Soriano decision, and the two home runs he gave up in the 9th, overawed what had been a solid outing for the ballclub, and one in which one of the toughest line-ups in the game had put seven runs on the board in nine innings.

The Nationals seven runs had come courtesy of a cascade of hits from Adam LaRoche (who’s first inning home run scored Anthony Rendon), Ian Desmond and Bryce Harper (whose fourth inning singles yield a third run), a Rendon double that scored Denard Span (in the 5th) and a Jayson Werth ground rule double and Adam LaRoche sacrifice fly in the 7th.

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Strasburg Sharp As Nats Sink Seattle

Sunday, August 31st, 2014

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When Stephen Strasburg is on there is simply no one better, and the Washington ace showed why on Saturday night, throwing 7.2 innings while striking out eight in leading the Nationals to a 3-1 victory against the Mariners in Seattle. Strasburg’s eight Ks set a franchise record for strikeouts in a year, surpassing that set by Gio Gonzalez two years ago.

The Strasburg victory was a vindication for the righty, who struggled in his last outing and has been viewed as inconsistent by many baseball analysts. He was anything but on Saturday, walking none and allowing a single earned run (on a Dustin Ackley home run), in notching his 11th victory of the season.

“Just the fact that he had two good ones and then a little bit of a clunker, and tonight to come back and answer, for him is important,” Washington skipper Matt Williams said of Strasburg. “For him, it’s just that if he throws it where he wants to, he can be dominant out there.

“I had pretty good fastball command today and kind of set up my other pitches,” Strasburg said of his outing. “I wanted to go out and give everything I had until [Williams] took the ball out of my hand. I just stuck to the game plan. I just had to execute pitches. I made them hit my best stuff.”

The Nationals scored early off of Seattle starter Roenis Elias. The Nationals plated two runs in the first inning when Jayson Werth hit his fifteenth home run of the season, scoring Denard Span who had reached on an error. Washington added a third run on an Anthony Rendon double in the fifth, which scored Jose Loboton.

The 3-1 victory put the Nationals up by seven games in the National League East, as the Braves lost to the Marlins 4-0 in Atlanta. The Nationals have a shot at sweeping Seattle today, with Tanner Roark facing off against the Mariners Hisashi Iwakuma.

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Those Are The Details, Now For The Headlines: MASN on-field analyst Dan Kolko engaged in an interesting bit of speculation on Saturday, pointing out that if the Nationals had finished just a bit better back in 2008, Seattle would have drafted Stephen Strasburg first overall in 2009, with Dustin Ackley falling to the Nationals with the second overall pick . . .

Seattle thought that the North Carolina hitter was bound for stardom and he might well be, but it’s taken him some time to develop — so long, in fact, that many Mariners fans were will to label him as a “bust” at any point over the intervening years. But Ackley, after hitting just .215 up to July 1, has found his swing and is hitting .313 since . . .

Seattle partisans point to the addition of Robinson Cano as the reason for Seattle’s revival, but the club was 16-8 in August, when Ackley drove in 19 of his 55 RBIs. Ackley credits his turnaround to fixing a glitch in his swing . . .

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One For The Books: Nats Blast The Giants, 14-6

Monday, August 25th, 2014

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Can the Nats hit in big games? Can they move runners over, hit behind them, launch massive home run shots that plate big runs? Can they play from behind? Are they an offensive powerhouse, or a team that sometimes (and really not that often), loses its center, allowing their opponents back into a game?

While sometimes nothing will convince a skeptic, Sunday afternoon’s Nationals 14-6 victory against the San Francisco Giants will assuredly silence all the negativity that followed the team through April and May. Yesterday, in front of 35,000-plus, the Nationals blasted the Giants with eighteen hits, six of which were doubles and three home runs. It was one of the most satisfying wins of the season.

Jayson Werth, Adam LaRoche, Asdrubal Cabrera, Bryce Harper, Scott Hairston and Jose Loboton doubled during the game and Ian Desmond, Harper and Danny Espinosa each hit home runs. The Nationals were 10-17 with runners in scoring position. The victory marked the end of a remarkable homestand in which the Nationals were 9-1, with five walk-off wins in a six game stretch.

“This was a great homestand,” Scott Hairston, who hit a clutch pinch-hit double in the fourth inning yesterday, said of the Nationals victory. “I’ve never experienced anything like it. I think it’s safe to say nobody has. And it’s a lot of fun.”

In spite of the fireworks that Nats hitters enjoyed on Sunday, the game started ominously, with righty Stephen Strasburg being pulled by Nats skipper Matt Williams after just four innings. Strasburg gave up eight hits and five earned runs, which included home runs to Gregor Blanco and Travis Ishikawa.

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Strasburg, who had pitched well in his previous two outings, with decisive performances against Arizona and the Mets, “didn’t have his A-game,” as reliever Craig Stammen noted, and had to be bailed out by the Nationals bullpen. Strasburg agreed with the assessment.

“I was making dumb pitches,” Strasburg said after the win. “On a 3-2 pitch, I have to execute a better pitch there to Blanco. The same with Ishikawa on the 1-2 pitch. You want to challenge them, but at the same time you have to focus on hitting your spots. I really wasn’t doing that today.”

With Strasburg on the bench, the Nationals mounted their comeback, taking advantage of Bruce Bochy’s decision to bring in Jeremy Affeldt in relief of Giants’ starter Ryan Vogelsong in the sixth inning. Affeldt faced five Washington hitters without getting an out — giving up a Bryce Harper double, singles to Asdrubal Cabrera and Jose Loboton, a Scott Hairston double and a Denard Span infield hit.

The Nationals bullpen also came through (as they almost always do) in a big way. Craig Stammen, Drew Storen, Tyler Clippard and Rafael Soriano gave up a single earned run in five innings of work, with Soriano closing out the game on a 1-2-3 ninth inning.

“Son of a gun, you just wanted an out anywhere and we couldn’t get it,” Giants manager Bruce Bochy said of the Nationals sixth inning offensive. The usually reliable Affeldt agreed, shaking his head in frustration at his own outing. “I take full responsibility for that game,” he said.

The Nationals also piled on five more runs in the 8th, though by then the Giants were well out of the game. Juan Gutierrez (“the human rain delay“) threw just 1.1 innings while giving up five earned runs, including home runs to Bryce Harper (his seventh) and Danny Espinosa (2-2 on the day) — his eighth.

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The Wisdom Of Section 1-2-9: Worries among 1-2-9 regulars over Bryce Harper’s ability to get on track after being on the disabled list have now been replaced by worries over the inconsistent pitching of Stephen Strasburg.  The section was moodily silent after Blanco and Ishikawi authored moon shots against the Washington “ace” . . .

“Look, it’s Gregor DiMaggio,” one regular noted when Gregor Blanco went deep. “Stras just looks terrible.” Another section season ticket holder shook his head. “You know, it could be that they’re just not letting him loose,” he argued. “This guy can throw 98 and once upon a time he did that regularly. They’re easing him back, when they should just let him throw what he wants . . . ”

“So what do we do with Strasburg?” a 1-2-9 regular asked as Craig Stammen emerged from the bullpen in relief of the big righty in the top of the 5th inning. “If this game is an indication, he’s no longer number one in the rotation. You can’t put him up front in the post-season, he’s just too inconsistent . . .”

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