Posts Tagged ‘cincinnati reds’

Werth Walk Off Wins It For The Nats

Monday, July 21st, 2014

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Jayson Werth’s ninth inning walk off double provided Washington with a dramatic 5-4 win over the Brewers at Nationals Park on Sunday, keeping the Nationals in first place in the National League East. The victory came after Milwaukee tied the contest in the top of the 9th on a Rickie Weeks single.

Werth’s walk-off brought the crowd of 36,000-plus to their feet in appreciation for the Washington right fielder. “That’s what it’s all about, right? It’s why we do this,” Werth said of his hit after the game. “If you find yourself in that situation and you don’t want to be there, I think you’re in the wrong line of work.”

But it wasn’t just Werth who was tough at the plate. The Nationals scalded twelve hits in the victory, including two hit days apiece from Denard Span, Adam LaRoche and Ryan Zimmerman. Zimmerman notched his fourth home run of the season in the 4th inning against Milwaukee starter Yovani Gallardo.

The Nationals’ victory sealed a series win against the Brewers, after a back-and-forth game that saw both teams fighting for the victory. The win helped retrieve a shaky start for Washington southpaw Gio Gonzalez, who gave up three runs in just 3.1 innings. But the Nationals bullpen picked up the slack, hurling 5.2 innings of one run baseball.

The Brewers hit Gonzalez hard, with Milwaukee’s usual suspects of Jonathan Lucroy and Khris Davis notching key RBIs. “It’s one of those games where you have to brush under the rug,” Gonzalez said of his less than stellar outing. “Nine days off, it didn’t help. Obviously, my command and fastball location wasn’t where I wanted it to be.”

This was a tough loss for the Brewers, who continue to make mental mistakes in close games. In the bottom of the 9th, with Washington’s Rendon headed towards home, outfielder Khris Davis overthrew the cutoff man, Jean Segura, allowing the Nationals to walk off. The play left Brewers’ manager Ron Roenicke fuming.

“If he hits the cutoff man, he’s out,” Roenicke said of the play. “And there should be somebody behind ‘Seggy,’ too, so if you overthrow him, there’s a second guy there.”

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Those Are The Details, Now For The Headlines: The pressure seems to be getting to Milwaukee, who once upon a time seemed to be running away with the National League Central. But no more: Prior to the All Star break the Crew lost a crucial series in Cincinnati, dropped four in a row to the Phillies and lost a series against the Cardinals . . .

Brewers manager Ron Roenicke is ripped. “You know, I don’t care about ‘the stretch’ and what happened before,” Roenicke angrily told the press after yesterday’s loss. “We’re playing a game now. I don’t care what happened in the past. We know where we are. We’re here to win games today. That’s all we’re worried about . . .”

The Cardinals, meanwhile, have been winning (despite their loss to the Dodgers last night) and are a workmanlike 9-6 in July. And the Reds are back from the dead, even though they were swept most recently by the Yankees. Then too, playing .500 ball might just be enough to win the suddenly weak National League Central . . .

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Nationals Scorebook: May 20, 2014 (Reds Vs. Nationals)

Thursday, June 26th, 2014

This is our fifth edition of Nationals Scorebook, featuring the Nationals 9-4 victory over the Cincinnati Reds at Nationals Park. The Nationals blasted ace Cincinnati starter Johnny Cueto, with Doug Fister providing a quality outing in hurling seven innings of six hit baseball.

The Nationals win was the news of the day for May 20 — because Washington rocked Cueto, one of the league’s elite pitchers.

Washington notched nine hits against Cincinnati pitching, with Denard Span’s 5-5 game pacing the Nationals. Danny Espinosa accounted for two of the team’s nine RBIs. The Nationals record improved to 24-21 with the win.

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Roark (And The Nats Bullpen) Stump The Braves

Sunday, June 22nd, 2014

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Nationals skipper Matt Williams remained his usual unsmiling self after the Nationals bested the Braves on Sunday afternoon at Nationals Park, but allowed himself a fleeting moment of semi-humor. “I am going to respectfully not answer that question, if that’s okay,” he said when asked if the Nationals now had momentum in the N.L. East. “I know how this works.”

It’s not superstition exactly, but it’s pretty close: As Williams himself noted, “there’s a long way to go” and “we need to take one game at a time.” But Washington’s 4-1 win and a split in the Atlanta series in front of 39,000-plus Nats fans must have come as a relief to Williams, as it did to the Nationals players.

“Oh yeah, they’ve had our number,” Nats center fielder Denard Span, who got a key hit in the win, said after the victory. “So it’s good to come away with a win today.” The Nationals Sunday win came on yet another strong pitching performance from starter Tanner Roark — and a shutdown bullpen that yielded nadda, zippo, zero (3.2 innings, no hits and three strikeouts) to a tough hitting Braves line-up.

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Roark, who lasted 5.1 innings, did not have his best stuff, but set the tone by holding the Braves to four hits. Roark was frustrating for Braves hitters, who argued several high strike zone calls from home plate umpire Mark Carlson. The Braves Chris Johnson was ejected in the top of the 6th (here’s the video, and we trust you can read lips) and Justin Upton was tossed just prior to the end of the game.

The Nationals put two runs on the board in the bottom of the 1st (on an Adam LaRoche single and a Ryan Zimmerman sacrifice fly), added single runs in the 5th (on a clutch Denard Span double that scored Sandy Leon), and added an insurance run in the 8th when Anthony Rendon scored on a wild pitch.

The Nationals broke out for nine hits in their win on Sunday, but the key to the series split was the team’s pitching — and particularly their relief corps. Storen, Clippard and Soriano all pitched well in the series, but Craig Stammen was the standout, throwing 4.2 innings in relief while giving up a single hit. If we had to pick a hurler to go to Minneapolis for the All Star game, it would be Stammen.

Those Are The Details, Now For The Headlines: Speaking of superstition — as soon as we wrote that Cincinnati should shovel their bats into a wood chipper they scored eleven runs on Saturday and another four today. This followed the 14-8 stunner on Friday night, in which they led Toronto 8-0 after two, but ended up losing the game . . .

We know how it looks, but we’re going to stick with what we said. Of all the teams in the National League, the Cincinnati Bridesmaids are the most disappointing. They hit more home runs than the Nationals (not a surprise, come to think of it), but can’t seem to put runs on the board when they need to, and seem to fall asleep in big games. It’s a puzzle . . .

The only reason we mention this is that our cheeky coverage of the Redlegs sparked an avalanche of reader emails (well, an avalanche for us), decrying our anti-Cincinnati bias and our “premature prediction” (all predictions are, by nature, premature — but nevermind) in counting them out of the running in the N.L. Central . . .

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Nats Rally, But Braves Win In 13

Saturday, June 21st, 2014

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Anthony Rendon’s dramatic 9th inning homer knotted a game at four apiece last night at Nationals Park, but Atlanta prevailed in a 13 inning strike out fest to win their second straight against their in-division rivals, 6-4. The Nats loss and Bravos win edged Atlanta into first place in the National League East.

Atlanta starter Mike Minor was the key for the Braves in the early going, throwing seven innings of seven hit baseball and holding the Nationals to just two runs. In what is becoming a season-long habit, the Nats left four runners in scoring position in four key innings, but couldn’t bring them home.

“He was keeping us off balance,” Nationals first baseman Adam LaRoche said of Minor’s outing. “He didn’t get into any patterns. I don’t remember a lot of hitters’ counts. He was getting those early strikes and he was playing around with the offspeed and mixing in some fastballs.”

The Nationals responded to the Braves challenge by sending their own ace to the mound, but while steady righty Stephen Strasburg struck out eight Atlanta hitters, he gave up four earned runs on nine hits through six innings.

The Nationals seemed destined for a loss until Rendon’s 9th inning heroics. After a Nate McLouth walk to lead off the inning against all-world closer Craig Kimbrel, the Atlanta fireballer set down Greg Dobbs and Denard Span. But Rendon, who followed Span to the plate, put a 98 mph Kimbrel fastball into the left field seats to tie the game.

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Rendon’s homer not only lifted the Nationals, it seemed a turning point in what has been Washington’s tradition against Atlanta. The Nationals are 7-20 against the Braves since the start of last season, one of those teams (along with St. Louis) that the team can’t seem to beat when they need to.

The score remained tied at four until the top of the 13th, when the Braves rallied for two runs against Nats reliever Jerry Blevins. Blevins started the inning by walking B.J. Upton, then gave up a single to the heavy hitting Freddie Freeman before giving up a run scoring line drive single to Evan Gattis. Atlanta plated another run on a fielder’s choice grounder from Andrelton Simmons.

Nats skipper Matt Williams remained his usual unflappable self after the defeat, shrugging off Washington’s inability to beat the Braves in big games. Williams focused on the positive — that the Nationals were able to get to Kimbrel.

“We came back against one of the best closers in the game to tie the game. We had an opportunity,” Williams told the D.C. sports press. “We lost it. I’m proud of them for fighting back, staying in it, getting ourselves an opportunity. He doesn’t give up many homers.”

The Nationals seemed over anxious at the plate on Friday, notching an astonishing 17 strikeouts in facing Braves pitching. Jayson Werth struck out four times. Perhaps the team, and Jayson, were over anxious after their anemic three hit performance on Thursday.

Those Are The Details, Now For The Headlines: While the Nationals and Braves were running up the Ks (33 in all on Friday), the rest of the league was racking up the homers . . .

After taking an eight run lead against the Blue Jays in Cincinnati (yes, it was 8-0 after two innings), Toronto rallied for three in the 3rd, two in the 6th, one in the 8th and (count ‘em) five in the 9th to down the Reds 14-9 . . .

Cincinnati is the closest thing to a stand-up comedy routine as there is in baseball, and Friday was a classic. The Reds haven’t hit all season, so their fans went nuts when their team scored eight in the bottom of the 2nd. But Toronto (who’s never finished, it seems), rallied on four home runs, two of them from Edwin Encarnacion, the Blue Birds version of Babe Ruth . . .

Prior to their eight run outburst on Friday, the Redlegs were contemplating consigning their bats to a wood chipper. Maybe they should. The Reds are 12th in the league in runs scored and 10th in home runs, despite the presence of Joey Votto & Co. in their line-up. But Cincy rarely faces the likes of the Blue Jays, who hit home runs like we eat peanuts . . .

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Darvish Silences The Nats

Sunday, June 1st, 2014

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Washington belted out fifteen hits in the first of three games against the Rangers and twelve in the second, but today Texas starter Yu Darvish silenced the Nationals, holding Washington to just five hits in eight complete innings of work and leading his team to a 2-0 win. Darvish was masterful, throwing 102 pitches, 70 of them for strikes; he struck out twelve.

Texas scored a single run on a seventh inning home run from Leonys Martin and notched its second run on a Donnie Murphy single that scored Dan Robertson in the eighth. That was all that Darvish would need, as Washington was unable to deal with his mix of splitters, sinkers and two seam fastballs.

“That team for two days just swung the bats at will, threw the ball around the ballpark, out of the ballpark,” Texas manager Ron Washington said of the Nationals after the Darvish outing. “We certainly needed to try to slow them down, and (Darvish) did that. He slowed them down. Yu was good today. He was very good. When the team needed him to be very good, he was.”

Despite Darvish’s brilliance, Washington starter Tanner Roark matched him pitch for pitch until Martin’s 7th inning home run. Roark has been one of Washington’s steadiest starters, and he showed why on Sunday, throwing twelve ground ball outs to a line-up looking for hits.

“He made one mistake to Martin, a changeup that was up in the strike zone,” Washington manager Matt Williams said of his starter. “Other than that, he matched him perfectly.” Roark has lost his last three starts, but has allowed only eight earned runs over his last 32 2/3 innings of work. In those three starts, Roark has actually lowered his ERA, from 3.65 to 3.25.

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Those Are The Details, Now For The Headlines: What fun it’s been to watch that kerfuffle in St. Louis. The Giants edged the Cardinals in the opener of their four game series on Thursday (Final: 6-5). then bombed the Redbirds on Friday (and it was ugly, 9-2), before dropping a tight one last night, with the Cards Michael Wacha throwing a (phew) 2-0 shutout . . .

So today, with St. Louis looking to even the series, the Giants responded by blowing out the Cards, 8-0. This was standard fare for the McCovey’s, who have a habit of making a very good pitcher (today it was Lance Lynn, Friday it was Adam Wainwright), look merely mortal . . .

Lynn surrendered three straight singles in what had to be the longest first inning in baseball history (well, probably not) — but 21 minutes after starting the game, Lynn finally headed to the dugout, having given up four singles, a walk and (oh, yeah) four runs . . .

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Nats Salvage A Win In Pittsburgh Behind Fister

Sunday, May 25th, 2014

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The Nationals have good pitching and it shows: after doing a three game face plant in Pittsburgh, Washington brought out starter Doug Fister, their most recent version of a stopper, and the former Tiger shut down the Pirates in leading the home towners to a much needed 5-2 win.

Facing off against savvy veteran Francisco Lariano, Fister threw into the 6th inning, holding the Pirates to six hits while striking out four. Fister also had help from Nats hitters, who reversed their recent trend of leaving runners in scoring position. Denard Span, Anthony Rendon and Ian Desmond led Washington’s hit parade, with Desmond accounting for two Washington RBIs.

But the big blow for the Nationals came in the fifth inning, when Anthony Rendon tripled to right center field, the ball ricocheting off the bottom of the outfield wall after the normally heroic Josh Harrison, with a reputation of robbing the Nationals of long drives, could not reach it.

The victory was a welcome change for the Nats, who needed to snap out of a swoon that saw them lose four of their last six games. The win brought them back to .500, and within easy striking distance of the first place Braves. The Nationals now return home for a Memorial Day matinee against the struggling Miami Marlins.

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Washington put ten hits on the board, the most they have had in four game losing streak. While the Nationals have not been anemic at the plate (notching 22 hits in their single loss to Cincinnati and the three losses in Pittsburgh), they have either consistently failed to come up with a big hit in clutch situations — or been robbed of hits when they most needed them.

The Nationals seemed to turn all of that around on Sunday. When it appeared that Josh Harrison had made another spectacular catch in right field in the 7th inning on Sunday, Matt Williams successfully appealed the called out. The review showed that Harrison had not caught the ball — which put Desmond on first. The Nationals ended up putting a final run on the board in that inning.

The Nationals bullpen, which is the best weapon the team has in the early going, was as steady as always in the Sunday win. Craig Stammen needed a single pitch to get out of a two on no outs situation in relief of Fister in the sixth, while Alfonso Soriano tabbed his 11th save.

Those Are The Details, Now For The Headlines: The steadiest, and most underrated, National of all might well be Stammen. Hard to believe, but the once upon a time wannabe starter is now 30 — and pitching like the veteran that he is. Stammen had a little hiccup on Sunday, giving up a run in two innings, but he sports a 2.24 ERA in 26 innings of work . . .

Stammen is on track to eclipse his innings count for the last two seasons: last year he threw 81 innings and appeared in 55 games, the year before he threw 88 innings and appeared in 88. His early years, toiling as a starter, were his most frustrating. The key for Stammen is his slider, which is his out pitch, but his menu includes a sneaky sinker. He also has a Burt Hooten style knuckle curve . . .

We were pleased when we saw the Nationals opening line-up today, though not simply because Adam LaRoche was penciled in after a stint on the disabled list. The line-up did not include Nate McLouth, who raised our ire on Saturday by striking out looking in the 9th against Pittsburgh closer Mark Melancon. In order to “get your swing” you actually need to swing and McLouth stood flat-footed as Melancon served up a fat 91 mph cutter . . .

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Nats Notes: Splitting With The Mets And Reds . . .

Friday, May 23rd, 2014

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The Washington Nationals split the homestand against the New York Mets and Cincinnati Reds three games to three, winning the first series and losing the second. It is tempting for the Nats Nation to blame this water-treading performance on having so many big bats out of commission: Bryce Harper, Ryan Zimmerman, Adam LaRoche.

But we don’t buy it. Consider: when all three were healthy and just catcher Wilson Ramos and righty starter Doug Fister were on the DL, the longest winning streak the Nats put together lasted a measly four games.

Then too, Washington’s hitters won the series against the Madoffs in spite of the lengthy list of names on the DL. Starting pitchers Tanner Roark and Jordan Zimmermann were good, but not great, in their starts, and Gio Gonzalez tried to play through a sore shoulder and whiffed it.

The relief corps, as we’ve come to expect, did their jobs, giving up just four hits and no runs over thirteen total innings. Ian Desmond started to come alive at the plate, getting four hits, a walk, and four RBIs in the series, and Wilson Ramos notched five RBIs off a double, a single, and a sac fly.

The series loss against the Redlegs was a damn near thing, literally decided by inches (twice) in Game One. Credit where credit is due: Reds second-sacker Brandon Phillips and centerfielder Billy Hamilton made fantastic diving plays in the 12th and 15th innings to snuff potential Nats’ walk-offs. Ross Detwiler got the loss, but it’s hard to fault a guy (too much) for allowing a homer to arguably the Reds’ best infielder, Todd Frazier — who produced all series long.

Nats starters Stephen Strasburg and Fister were both great in their games, but Tanner Roark struggled. The Nats can take some satisfaction from having eaten Redlegs starter and best pitcher in the majors Johnny Cueto — plating eight runs against the now healthy (and now celebrated) righty. The Nats were good — yes — but the lineup was still milquetoast in the series.

Well, except for Denard Span who apparently heard all the criticisms being leveled at him — and responded by getting nine hits and four RBIs (including his first homer of the season) in the one game against Cincy that we can class a “laugher.”

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