Posts Tagged ‘Drew Storen’

Zimmerman Single Seals Series Win

Sunday, July 6th, 2014

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The Washington Nationals got a taste of Cubs righty Jake Arrieta on Sunday, and he was everything Cubs fans say he is. Arrieta battled Washington ace Jordan Zimmerman for six full innings, a toe-to-toe pitching duel that was among the best played and hardest fought games at Nationals Park this year.

But the difference between Arrieta and Zimmermann in this game was that when Zimmermann left the contest (after throwing 105 pitches and keeping the Cubs off the board), the Nationals had supported their starter by scoring a single run, which was something the Cubs had failed to do for Arrieta.

It’s not surprising, then, that Sunday’s match-up came down to who had the better bullpen — and the better clutch hitting. In the end, Washington proved why their relievers are considered among the best in the game, while Cubs relievers are just so-so (and are 13th in the majors), with Pedro Strop giving up the go-ahead run on a single off the bat of Ryan Zimmerman in the 8th inning.

Zimmerman’s hit gave the Nats the win, as closer Rafael Soriano came on in the 9th to shut down the Cubs, notching his 21st save on the year. It was another high pressure performance from the Nationals third sacker, known for his plate discipline in clutch situations when playing at home.

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“It’s good to get the win against these guys,” Zimmerman said after the game, “and its good that we have such strong starting pitching. This was a tough game.”

The Cubs Arrieta (“he came as advertised,” Zimmerman said), agreed: “It was a dogfight,” Arrieta said after the game. “I really had to grind it out there. I had guys on base. I had to make pitches in big situations. I was able to do that.”

In fact, the Cubs outhit the Nationals on Sunday, spraying ten hits against five Nationals pitchers, while the Nats made do with seven. But the Cubs weren’t able to move their base runners home, stranding 20 of them through nine innings and were 1-9 with runners in scoring position.

The Nationals win gave Washington the series against a tenacious Chicago line-up, but the triumph didn’t come easy. Starter Jordan Zimmermann had to wriggle out of a jam in the 3rd, reliever Drew Storen got into trouble in the top of the 7th (and gave up the run that tied the game), and Tyler Clippard got in trouble in the 8th, but got two outs after putting two Cubs on base.

Zimmerman’s GW/RBI capped what was a monster series for him, as he now seems all the way back from an early season injury that sidelined him and left the Nationals line-up punchless. Zim has notched 13 hits in his last ten games, raising his average by 30 points. He was 6-12 in the Cubs series.

Jordan Zimmermann has been just as impressive, albeit on the mound. In June, Zimmermann put himself in contention for this year’s Cy Young, notching a 1.43 ERA in 44 innings. In all of June the Ace of Auburndale gave up six walks while striking out 41. Opponents in June hit .189 against him.

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Harper Returns, Zim Leads Nats Over Rockies

Tuesday, July 1st, 2014

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Bryce Harper returned to the Nationals line-up on Monday night in D.C., but it was Ryan Zimmerman who led the way, going 3-4 and leading Washington to a 7-3 victory over visiting Colorado. Harper, who was out of the line-up for the last 57 games, chalked up his first RBI since returning, singling home Zimmerman in the bottom of the 4th.

“It’s good to get that W. It’s huge,” Harper said following the Nats victory. The win allows the Nationals to keep pace with the Atlanta Braves, who beat the Mets in New York, and who remain one-half game in front of Washington in the N.L. East.

While the Nationals stroked nine hits against Colorado pitching, it was starter Jordan Zimmermann who kept the Rockies off the board. The righty gave up seven hits and struck out five in six innings of work, notching his sixth win of the season.

“I thought I pitched pretty well,” Zimmermann said of his outing. “I really had only two pitches — fastball and slider — the whole game. I didn’t throw any curveballs. I threw a few changeups. I mixed them up pretty good.” Drew Storen, Aaron Barrett and Jerry Blevins closed out the games for the Nationals, allowing Colorado a single run in the late going.

While Harper got most of the fan attention on Bryce Harper Bobblehead night, Zimmerman’s apparent return to form at the plate was the other big story. Zimmerman has been struggling since his return from the disabled list, hitting well below his usual .270-.290 clip.

The turning point in the game came in the bottom of the 6th, when the Nats broke through for five runs, sending 10 hitters to the plate against starter Yohan Flande and reliever Rob Scahill. The big blow was an Ian Desmond double, which scored Jayson Werth, Ryan Zimmerman and Bryce Harper.

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Those Are The Details, Now For The Headlines: “So far as I know, Bryce Harper doesn’t fill out the line-up card,” MASN commenter F.P. Santangelo said last night during the Colorado-Washington broadcast. F.P. was responding to Bryce Harper’s pre-game comments that implied he should be playing centerfield, with Zimmerman in left, Espinosa at second and Rendon at third . . .

F.P.’s got it right, of course, and we agree. Boiled out to its minimum, Harper should not have said anything at all. Since we’re available for counseling, here’s what we would have Harper say: “I’m just happy to be back and will play where the skipper puts me,” or how about “these kinds of decisions show just how great this team is, with lots of everyday players . . .”

The Post’s Thomas Boswell danced all over Harper’s comments this morning, quoting G.M. Mike Rizzo’s defense of him. Harper, Rizzo recently said, “has had two great seasons.” But Boswell’s Fred Astaire routine couldn’t cover up his final judgment, which is F.P.’s — it’s Harpers job to be in the line-ups, not make them . . .

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Nats Win In 16 On Zimmerman Home Run

Wednesday, June 25th, 2014

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Ryan Zimmerman’s two run home run in the top of the 16th inning was the difference in Washington’s 4-2 victory over the Brewers on Tuesday night (actually, Wednesday morning) — what went into the books as the longest game in Nationals history. By then, the Nationals had burned through their bullpen, and were set to send Adam LaRoche to the mound in the 17th.

While Zimmerman notched the game winning RBI, the Nationals bullpen was once again stellar. Jerry Blevins, Aaron Barrett, Craig Stammen, Ross Detwiler, Drew Storen and Tyler Clippard pitched the near-equivalent of a complete game, ending Milwaukee threats in the bottom of the 13th, 14th and 15th innings.

The Washington Post notes that the game used up “fifteen pitchers and 24 position players” and that “485 pitches were thrown and the teams combined for 111 at-bats.” By the time the game was over, Washington starter Jordan Zimmermann’s solid start (six innings, six hits, nine strike outs) was a fading memory.

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Zimmermann had no-hitter stuff to begin the game, but the Brewers pressed him hard in the fourth and fifth innings. “The fourth and fifth were a little rough,” Zimmermann acknowledged on his outing. “First time through the lineup, I used the fastball and it was good. Second time through, they made some adjustments. I was leaving some balls up. They strung a few hits together.”

While it was Zimmerman who keyed the victory, much of the credit for the win must go to lefty Ross Detwiler, who threw four innings of four hit baseball in relief. It was, by far, Detwiler’s best outing of the year. “Det was above and beyond tonight,” manager Matt Williams said. “Going in, we had some guys that were feeling [tired], so we didn’t want to go to them. Turned out, we had to. Det was fantastic. He really stretched it for us.”

This was a big win for the Nationals, a victory over a tough team with a solid and power-packed line-up. The win kept Washington two games in front of Atlanta in the National League East and, after the Nationals throat gulping performance against the Cardinals, showed that the team can play tough against tough teams.

For the Brewers, on the other hand, the twin losses against the Nationals throw a shadow on a season that, at least so far, has been a dream. But despite the two losses, Milwaukee leads the National League in wins and they remain 4.5 games ahead of the Cardinals in the N.L. Central.

The Brewers loss squandered an excellent outing from Yovani Gallardo, who threw six innings while giving up just four hits. Like Washington, Milwaukee had to depend on its bullpen, with Mike Fiers pitching the last four innings of the marathon game and taking the loss.

Those Are The Details, Now For The Headlines: Theo Epstein’s Chicago Cubs, the doormat of the N.L. Central, have set a pattern — the front office accumulates veteran hurlers, then swaps them out for younger pieces. This has occurred in each of the last three years, with Epstein shipping aging arms Paul Maholm, Matt Garza and Scott Feldman hither and yon for younger arms and a handful of prospects and potentials . . .

Now, those swaps are starting to work out, and the future Cubbies are finally beginning to take shape. Fans of the North Siders could see that future on the mound at Wrigley last night, when former Orioles prospect Jake Arrieta continued his remarkable climb to prominence as a solid Cubs starter . . .

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Gio, LaRoche Key Nats 3-0 Win Against The Crew

Tuesday, June 24th, 2014

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Gio Gonzalez was anxious to fit back into the rotation, particularly after his first start since returning from the disabled list proved so unsatisfying. But on Monday night in Milwaukee Gonzalez seemed to fit right in, hurling six innings of three hit baseball in leading the Nationals to a 3-0 victory over the Brewers at Miller Park.

“It was one of those nights where I needed to bounce back,” Gonzalez said following the victory. “I was just proud to see these guys compete and give me a chance to be part of this rotation. Being the odd man out right now, you want to be 100 percent at their level. Seeing the way these guys are throwing the ball, you want to make sure you don’t fall behind.”

Gonzalez admitted after the game that he did not have his best stuff. But he was able to befuddle Brewers’ hitters by ample use of his change-up, which was particularly effective in a difficult bases loaded jam in the bottom of the third. “He was working with changeups,” Milwaukee’s Carlos Gomez noted. “We didn’t expect him to be working with changeups. It was a really good pitch for him. He threw the ball well, so we have to give the credit.”

The Nationals stroked seven hits against Milwaukee pitching, five of them against Brewers’ starter Matt Garza. But the big hit in the game came off the bat of Adam LaRoche in the third inning, when the first sacker took a Garza slider deep to center field to give the Nats the only runs they would need. The blast scored Anthony Rendon and Jayson Werth.

“In that spot, you’re really just trying to hit something hard and hit something in the air. It just happened to go out of the park,” LaRoche said of his at-bat. “It was one of the few mistakes he [Garza] made.”

The game was not without its controversy. When Danny Espinosa was called out looking at an out-of-the-zone ball in the top of the 2nd, Nationals’ skipper Matt Williams argued the call with umpire Mark Wegner — and was thrown out of the game. Randy Knorr then took over managing the team the rest of the way. This was the first time this season that the normally fiery Williams was tossed.

Once again the Washington bullpen showed why it’s the best in the majors. Aaron Barrett, Drew Storen and Tyler Clippard were flawless in three innings of work, with Clippard striking out the side in the 9th inning to notch his first save in nearly two years.

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Those Are The Details, Now For The Headlines: Everyone in Milwaukee is yakking about the year that Brewers’ catcher Jonathan Lucroy is having at the plate, a line (.331, .397, .520) that puts him in the running for a slot on the National League All Star team. He’s one of the reasons that the Brewers are the surprise team in the N.L. Central . . .

But Lucroy is just one of Milwaukee’s bashers, with a line-up filled with fleet-footed slick fielding singles hitters (like Jean Segura, who scored from first on a wild pitch this last weekend), supplemented by dueling long ball artists (Ryan Braun and Carlos Gomez) and swing-and-miss or hit-em-long bombers, like the much-traveled Mark Reynolds . . .

But our favorite Brewer (though, we admit, the bar is low) is Aramis Ramirez, the Crew’s underrated third baseman. Injured most of last year, the Younts limped home in fourth place, fourteen games under .500. But the year before, with Ramirez’s fifty doubles in the line-up (he led the league), the Brewers made a stab at the Central Division flag . . .

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Nats Hold Off Astros, Back In The Win Column

Wednesday, June 18th, 2014

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Dallas Keuchel is probably the best pitcher you’ve never heard of. Entering Tuesday’s game at Nationals Park, the Houston southpaw (at 8-3 and with a snappy 2.38 ERA) was known for two things: getting great hitters to hit groundballs and getting good hitters to miss them.

But on Tuesday, the Nationals got to Houston’s young lefty, mixing line-drives with a raft of doubles to give the All Star-bound Keuchel his fourth loss of the season. In all, the resurgent Nationals (coming off a four game slump and a sweep in St. Louis) banged out six runs and nine hits on Houston pitching, downing the ‘Stros 6-5.

While the victory propelled Washington back into first place in the N.L. East (but just by a scootch), the win wasn’t as decisive as it might have been. Starter Tanner Roark could not locate his fastball (“my bailout was my curveball tonight,” he confirmed after his outing), while Houston’s impressive array of young hitters rallied against reliever Tyler Clippard, scoring four in the 8th.

Washington starter Tanner Roark lasted just five innings, but took the win, his sixth of the season. “It was a grind. Just one of those nights,” Roark said. “I couldn’t get ahead, but came up with some big pitches. And of course we come out early and score runs so it takes a lot of weight off.”

Washington’s anemic offense, on full display in St. Louis, got hot on Tuesday, with both Ryan Zimmerman and Anthony Rendon accounting for five of Washington’s six runs. Rendon doubled twice to drive in three runs, while Zimmerman added two doubles and two RBIs.

Tuesday night’s negative came from Tyler Clippard who had an unusual (which is to say — unheard of) meltdown in the 8th. Following on solid outings from relievers Craig Stammen and Drew Storen, Clippard gave up five hits and four runs in pitching just two-thirds of an inning.

In truth, however, some of Clippard’s difficulties came from facing a Houston line-up that has the best record in baseball since May 22. The 8th showed why so many in the game are suddenly paying attention to the Astros, with Houston’s line-up stacked with a budding superstar second sacker (Jose Altuve) a long ball rookie in George Springer and a left handed hitting gapper in Jon Singleton.

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Those Are The Details, Now For The Headlines: If the Miami Marlins played all of their games at home they’d walk away with the National League East. On Tuesday night, after losing to the Cubs the night before (and after falling to the Bucs in two of three games), the Marlins rallied for a 6-5 victory behind a three run homer from Garrett Jones . . .

The Marlins are 24-14 at Marlins Park, where it’s still possible to overhear private conversations — and where home runs hit to left field can be picked up by the cleaning crew at the end of a game. Last night, the Marlins played in front of 20,000 fans, not bad (actually) for a team that’s 26th in attendance . . .

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A Lousy 7th Dooms The Nats

Sunday, June 15th, 2014

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A lead off home run from Matt Adams and a rare breakdown in the Nationals bullpen spelled the difference between victory and defeat on Saturday, as Washington dropped its second straight game to St. Louis, 4-1. Washington starter Stephen Strasburg paid the price for the team’s poor showing in the 7th inning, after throwing what looked to be his standard starting gem.

The 7th was the difference. After Matt Adams led off the inning with a home run, giving the Cardinals a 2-1 lead, St. Louis outfielder Jon Jay singled — which marked the end of Strasburg’s night after a solid 95 pitching outing. With reliever Jerry Blevins on the mound, Jose Lobaton allowed a passed ball and Blevins walked Matt Carpenter.

Even with men on first and second, Washington might well have survived the St. Louis surge. But usually lights-out reliever Drew Storen then hit second sacker Mark Ellis and (with the bases loaded), Storen walked Matt Holliday, which scored a  St. Louis run, giving the Cardinals a 3-1 lead. An Allen Craig single then plated the third run of the inning, giving St. Louis the 4-1 victory.

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“The ball slipped out of his [Storen's] hand on a curveball and then he hit him and then he kind of got all over the place,” manager Matt Williams said of his reliever’s outing. “We got out of the inning, but the damage was done at that point. They’ve been good. The bullpen’s been very good. It’s going to have a hiccup every once in a while.”

While the 7th inning was the talk of both clubhouses after the Nationals defeat, Washington’s inability to hit St. Louis pitching was a major subtext of the series. The Nationals banged out a measly four hits against St. Louis pitching on Saturday and were unable to get to St. Louis starter Shelby Miller.

Miller, a first round pick of St. Louis in 2009 — the year that Strasburg was the MLB player draft’s first overall pick (and Storen was ninth) — struck out seven Nationals hitters in sealing the St. Louis win. “What can you say?” Nationals catcher Jose Lobaton acknowledged after the defeat. “They’ve been throwing good and today was one of those days.”

Those Are The Details, Now For The Headlines: Saturday was a tough day for the National League East. The Nationals, Braves, Mets and Marlins were all losers, with the Phillies the only team to come away with a win . . .

The Braves were defeated 11-6 in 13 innings in Atlanta, with the Halos scoring five runs in the top of the 13th inning on a bases loaded single from Kole Calhoun. The Braves deflating loss (after their 4-3 win against the Belinskys on Friday) kept the Nationals in a tie with Atlanta atop the division . . .

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Werth’s Last Second Leap Saves The Nats

Saturday, May 17th, 2014

Friday night’s victory over the New York Mets may well have marked the ultimate expression of closer Rafael Soriano’s habit of getting into deep trouble, but then managing to notch yet another save. On Friday, it was Jayson Werth who came to the rescue with a last second leap against the right field fence to save Soriano — and the game.

Werth’s acrobatic leap came on the last swing of the night, when the right fielder nabbed a long line drive off the bat of Daniel Murphy with two on and two out. The catch preserved a hard fought 5-2 Washington victory. “I probably should have untucked my shirt, but I didn’t,” Werth joked after the win, referring to Soriano’s signature game-over habit.

Washington scored all of their runs off of Mets’ starter Jonathan Niese by the end of the third inning. Washington scored three in the first on a Jayson Werth single and a Wilson Ramos sacifice fly. Washington capped their attack in the third inning, with a Scott Hairston double and a Tyler Moore single. Washington sprayed an impressive eleven hits in the contest.

Nats’ manager Matt Williams pulled starter Tanner Roark after the fifth inning, in deference to New York’s lefty weighted line-up — bringing in Ross Detwiler in relief. The Nats bullpen was perfect thereafter, with Detwiler, Drew Storen, Tyler Clippard and Soriano holding the Mets to three hits and no runs through four complete innings.

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Those Are The Details, Now For The Headlines: You would have thought that by now the Nats-Mets rivalry would be among the most bitterly fought in all of baseball. But that’s hardly the case. The Nats have won nine straight against the Apples, dating from last season. Dominance, it seems, does not a rivalry make . . .

The Lords of Baseball would have it otherwise, but the hype has never fit the facts. Even as MLB pushes the match-up as of abiding and traditional interest, the two franchises have forever been going in opposite directions: when the Nats were lousy (as, you might remember, they once were), the Mets were playing for pennants. Now, their roles are reversed . . .

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